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Wright-Patt helps train Dayton Airport firefighters

Dayton International Airport Fire Department Chief Duane Stitzel (left) discusses how to attack a blaze with one of his firefighters Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department assisted the DIA Fire Department in refresher training required for Federal Aviation Administration certification. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport Fire Department Chief Duane Stitzel (left) discusses how to attack a blaze with one of his firefighters Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department assisted the DIA Fire Department in refresher training required for Federal Aviation Administration certification. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

The Dayton International Airport Fire Department crash truck sprays down a live training fire Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosts outside agencies, including fire departments from the Springfield, Columbus and Dayton airports, to give them the opportunity to work on aircraft-fire skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

The Dayton International Airport Fire Department crash truck sprays down a live training fire Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosts outside agencies, including fire departments from the Springfield, Columbus and Dayton airports, to give them the opportunity to work on aircraft-fire skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A Dayton International Airport firefighter operates the top turret on his department’s crash truck Oct. 5, 2021, against a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The Federal Aviation Administration requires annual training using both turrets and hose lines. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A Dayton International Airport firefighter operates the top turret on his department’s crash truck Oct. 5, 2021, against a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The Federal Aviation Administration requires annual training using both turrets and hose lines. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Chief Duane Stitzel (left), Dayton International Airport Fire Department, talks with Jerry Hopewell, 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department firefighter and emergency medical technician, on Oct. 5, 2021, after one of his crews extinguished a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Hopewell was among the Wright-Patt firefighters who monitored and advised DIA counterparts. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Chief Duane Stitzel (left), Dayton International Airport Fire Department, talks with Jerry Hopewell, 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department firefighter and emergency medical technician, on Oct. 5, 2021, after one of his crews extinguished a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Hopewell was among the Wright-Patt firefighters who monitored and advised DIA counterparts. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters pull hoses from their crash truck Oct. 5, 2021, to advance on a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The reflection of flames from the aircraft fuselage mock-up can be seen in the truck’s windows. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters pull hoses from their crash truck Oct. 5, 2021, to advance on a live training fire at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The reflection of flames from the aircraft fuselage mock-up can be seen in the truck’s windows. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A Dayton International Airport firefighter operates a hose line against flames around an aircraft fuselage mock-up Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. A 788th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter monitors the training in the background. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A Dayton International Airport firefighter operates a hose line against flames around an aircraft fuselage mock-up Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. A 788th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter monitors the training in the background. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport Fire Department Chief Duane Stitzel (right) talks with some of his firefighters Oct. 5, 2021, between live training fires at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosts outside agencies, including fire departments from the Springfield, Columbus and Dayton airports, to give them the opportunity to work on aircraft-fire skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport Fire Department Chief Duane Stitzel (right) talks with some of his firefighters Oct. 5, 2021, between live training fires at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosts outside agencies, including fire departments from the Springfield, Columbus and Dayton airports, to give them the opportunity to work on aircraft-fire skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters gain access to an aircraft fuselage mock-up with a training fire inside Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The training included knocking down the fire and conducting rescue procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters gain access to an aircraft fuselage mock-up with a training fire inside Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The training included knocking down the fire and conducting rescue procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters work their way into a replica aircraft’s burning fuselage during training Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The training included knocking down the fire and gaining fuselage access for rescue. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

Dayton International Airport firefighters work their way into a replica aircraft’s burning fuselage during training Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The training included knocking down the fire and gaining fuselage access for rescue. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A Dayton International Airport firefighter attacks a training fire Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosted the airport’s department so it could get required refresher training on aircraft fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)
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A Dayton International Airport firefighter attacks a training fire Oct. 5, 2021, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department hosted the airport’s department so it could get required refresher training on aircraft fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

A sweaty Dayton International Airport firefighter strips off his bunker gear Oct. 5, 2021, at the end of nighttime training on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Local firefighters had to deal with multiple fires through the evening as the Wright-Patt crew threw different scenarios at them. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)
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A sweaty Dayton International Airport firefighter strips off his bunker gear Oct. 5, 2021, at the end of nighttime training on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Local firefighters had to deal with multiple fires through the evening as the Wright-Patt crew threw different scenarios at them. (U.S. Air Force photo by R.J. Oriez)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- The 788th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department provided training to the Dayton International Airport Fire Department at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base fire training facility Oct. 5.

A DIA crash truck and five firefighters came on base after dark to get the hands-on experience putting out aircraft fires.

“We have an annual certification requirement from (the Federal Aviation Administration),” said Chief Duane Stitzel, DIA Fire Department, “and that’s to do a live training fire every year involving an aircraft or an aircraft problem. Just like Wright-Patt is providing.”

Bryan Weeks, 788 CES Fire Department assistant chief for training, said the base is coded as an FAA site.

“They don’t have a capability to do live fire training,” he said. “So they contacted us and asked if they can come out and do live-fire training.”

The fire training facility features a jet fuselage mock-up with propane gas providing real flames, giving firefighters the opportunity to practice using their equipment and meet the certification requirements.

“We have specific scenarios,” Stitzel said. “We had to operate the turrets. We had to operate the hose lines. We had to fight an engine fire and a fuselage fire. So in between all those, Wright-Patt crews help us meet all those requirements (and) get all those skills.”

Although the FAA requires his department to go through live-fire training annually, Stitzel said he brings his firefighters out to the Wright-Patt facility twice a year for additional preparation.

“Getting this time to come out and operate our trucks on a prop of an aircraft makes a great educational opportunity,” he added. “They love coming out and doing this, and I just think the experience we get from it is great.”

Jon Shinkle, a DIA rescue firefighter, appreciates the rehearsal drills.

“It’s good to be able to get some practice, get your hands out on the hose lines and practice with the trucks,” Shinkle said. “Because outside of an actual incident happening, you don’t really get a chance.”

The Dayton Airport firefighter also said he sees it as more than just work.

“It can be fun,” Shinkle said. “But for me, I just want to correct any of my imperfections because you get a little rusty; knocking the rust off is basically the biggest thing.”

DIA is not the only other regional fire department Wright-Patt helps out.

“We usually have three to four outside agencies request to come do live-fire training with aircraft,” Weeks said. “The 445th (Airlift Wing), Springfield, and Grissom (Air Reserve Base, Indiana) contacted me this year. We’ve had Columbus and Dayton airports out.”