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CFC loaned executives embrace their volunteerism, commitment

Di Lynn (left), chief of War Gaming and Deliberate Planning, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, and Heather Atkinson, program manager, Foreign Military Sales, New Business in Simulators, Agile Combat Support Directorate, are serving as loaned executives for the 2018 Ohio Combined Federal Campaign, Dayton District, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and throughout a nine-county area.

Di Lynn (left), chief of War Gaming and Deliberate Planning, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, and Heather Atkinson, program manager, Foreign Military Sales, New Business in Simulators, Agile Combat Support Directorate, are serving as loaned executives for the 2018 Ohio Combined Federal Campaign, Dayton District, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and throughout a nine-county area.

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- Each year two people volunteer to serve as loaned executives for the 2018 Ohio Combined Federal Campaign, Dayton District, to execute the campaign at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and other federal entities in a nine-county area.

This year’s loaned executives are Heather Atkinson, program manager, Foreign Military Sales, New Business in Simulators, Agile Combat Support Directorate; and Di Lynn, chief of War Gaming and Deliberate Planning, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command.

Along with Susy Himelhoch, director, Dayton District CFC, the pair can be found at the CFC office at 1940 Allbrook Drive, Bldg. 1, Door 22, Area A, Wright-Patterson AFB.

Loaned executives work with agency chairpersons and key workers to make sure campaigns are running smoothly and creating awareness.

They help coordinate special events and make charities visible. Both began their CFC assignments in late August and jumped into the thick of the campaign.

They’ll serve the campaign until Nov. 30.

“Di Lynn and Heather Atkinson have embraced this assignment from day one,” Himelhoch said. “Their leadership skills, knowledge of our Department of Defense and federal communities, organizational expertise, flexibility and unflappable spirit have ensured this year’s campaign is off to a great start. Our governing board, participating charities and their beneficiaries, and I extend sincere thanks to Di and Heather’s home offices for loaning them to CFC for this assignment.”

“As a donor for years, I never realized how many people take the CFC incredibly seriously and do an amazing amount of work for it,” said Lynn, a retired Air Force first sergeant. “What has struck me the most is how caring people are about it, how much the charities depend on the money that comes through CFC and how much effort goes into making something like this successful.”

Atkinson said she has served as a key worker for several years for various organizations on base, following the example set by her father, Doug Atkinson, director of engineering, Fighters and Bombers Directorate, Air Force Life Cycle Management Center.

“I’m very interested in humanitarian causes and anti-human trafficking efforts,” she said. “I know how much this campaign means to them as they do really good work. I am passionate about working with CFC to give back.”

Atkinson said being able to interact with various charities’ personnel and attend different organizations’ campaign kickoffs haves been meaningful.

Lynn said she, too, appreciates becoming acquainted with others and how she has been touched by their stories and passion.

“It gives you that warm feeling all over. There are a lot of great people out there who really care about the future of the world,” she said.

Atkinson pointed to the CFC Charity Fair and Kickoff on Oct. 3 at Wright State University’s Nutter Center as having a tremendous impact on the campaign. More than 60 organizations were represented so prospective donors could learn more about their missions.

It’s now smaller events the loaned executives are pivoting to as they travel to organizations on and off base to assist with awareness events. They invite anyone who wishes to learn more about the campaign or a charity to contact them; they will be glad to coordinate a presentation.

“This is the largest workplace charitable campaign in the world,” Lynn said. “It’s very personal – it’s you and the charity or charities you choose.”

There are so many – more than 12,000 local, state, national and international charities from which to choose, Atkinson pointed out.

“It can be anything you feel passionate about,” she said. “Every dollar is so impactful. Every bit really makes a difference.”

To review charities and pledge, go online to www.ohiocfc.org.

This year’s blackout dates at Wright-Patterson AFB and Dayton’s VA Medical Center run through Nov. 16; both online pledges and paper pledge forms will be accepted through Jan. 11, 2019.

Being a part of the CFC won’t just benefit others. Both loaned executives said they also feel it’s personally fulfilling.

“It’s a great opportunity to spread your wings,” Lynn said. “If you can serve as a loaned executive, I recommend it.”

To contact the loaned executives, contact Atkinson at 937-904-3512 or heather.atkinson.1@us.af.mil; and Lynn at 937-904-3514 or diana.lynn@us.af.mil.

Dayton District CFC’s main line is 937-257-0292.