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711 HPW - United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Human-Rated Centrifuge

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Human Rated Centrifuge at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is the only one owned by the Department of Defense. (Courtesy photo)

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Human Rated Centrifuge at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is the only one owned by the Department of Defense. (Courtesy photo)

The only human rated centrifuge owned by the Department of Defense is located at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Aircrew acceleration training and research/testing missions are conducted in the centrifuge. (Courtesy photo)

The only human rated centrifuge owned by the Department of Defense is located at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Aircrew acceleration training and research/testing missions are conducted in the centrifuge. (Courtesy photo)

United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Human-Rated Centrifuge

The only human rated centrifuge owned by the Department of Defense is located at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM), located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. USAFSAM is assigned to the Air Force Research Laboratory's 711th Human Performance Wing.

USAFSAM's Aerospace Medicine Division provides initial and refresher acceleration training for all USAF fast-jet aviators in this human-rated centrifuge. The centrifuge allows students to experience up to 9 Gs, or nine times the normal force of gravity, to teach the effects of G-forces on human physiology and to measure the subject's ability to counteract the effects and prevent G-induced loss of consciousness. 

Aircrew acceleration training and research/testing missions are conducted in the centrifuge, which is capable of producing 20 times the force of gravity, or G's, and can accelerate up to 15 G's in one second.

Approximately 1,200 students (fighter pilots, aircrew members, flight surgeons, aerospace physiologists and others) can be trained in the centrifuge each year.

Pilots learn the anti-G straining maneuver to maintain consciousness at high G accelerations. Students are trained to no more than 9 G's.

The centrifuge has three interchangeable cockpits used for conducting the training and research/testing missions. Each cockpit is realistic and contains displays with high definition visuals.

A unique capability that has not existed in previous centrifuges is that all three cockpits can be linked with the control room to create a virutal battle space.

The pitch and roll axis are motorized to create a more realistic sensation.

The centrifuge system achieved Full Operational Capability status May 30, 2018 and will begin providing training to students Oct. 1, 2018.

Centrifuge specifications:

Arm length: 31 feet
Degrees of freedom: 3 (Planetary, Pitch, and Roll)
Maximum peak G: 20Gs
Maximum G-onset rate: 15Gs per second
Sustained G profile: 60 minutes
3 cockpit modules (two training and one research)
1,000 lb. payload capacity for research module
High fidelity virtual tactical simulation
Realistic Cockpits and Displays with High Definition Visuals (210º Horizontal and 120º Vertical)
97% operational availability

Centrifuge Motor specifications:

45 rpm max

- Power:
3.5 MW or 4,700 hp

- Torque:
@ 100% 1153 kNm or 850,409 ft lb