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Dr. Timothy J. Bunning, Chief Scientist, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, was elected to the 2017 Class of the American Chemical Society of Fellows. ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a leading source of authoritative science information, with more than 157,000 members worldwide. The fellow honor, awarded to only 65 members this year, recognizes members for distinguished contributions to science and for their contributions to development and leadership of the society. Bunning is one of only a handful of AFRL scientists to ever achieve this honor. (Courtesy photo) Air Force Senior Technologist named ACS Fellow
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio --  A principal scientific expert at the Air Force Research Laboratory was selected as a 2017 Fellow of the American Chemical Society for his outstanding achievements and contributions to science and professional leadership in the field.Dr. Timothy J. Bunning, Chief Scientist, Materials and Manufacturing
0 6/29
2017
The Air Force Research Laboratory’s AgilePod has commenced a series of flight tests aboard a Douglas DC-3 aircraft in preparation for integration on the Air Force MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle later this year. AgilePod is fully flight-line reconfigurable, and enables operators to meet a variety of mission sets with multiple sensors on a single platform. (U.S. Air Force photo/David Dixon) AFRL’s cutting edge ISR platform commences Harvest Reaper flight testing
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – A year of cutting-edge technology development and prototyping by Air Force Research Laboratory teams has culminated in a series of flight demonstrations as part of the Sensors Directorate Blue Guardian “Project Harvest Reaper.” AFRL’s AgilePod has embarked on a series of flight tests aboard a Douglas DC-3
0 6/15
2017
Researchers at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, have developed a novel, lightweight artificial hair sensor that mimics those used by natural fliers—like bats and crickets—by using carbon nanotube forests grown inside glass fiber capillaries. The hairs are sensitive to air flow changes during flight, enabling quick analysis and response by agile fliers. (Air Force courtesy photo). Bio-inspired: Crickets, bats inspire AFRL researchers to develop smart ‘hair’ sensors for flight
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio –  Nature has inspired scientific and engineering innovations for hundreds of years. An apple falling from a tree inspired Isaac Newton to define the laws of gravity. The burdock burrs clinging to the skin of his hunting dog lead to Swiss engineer Georges de Mestral’s invention of Velcro. The ability of the
0 5/08
2017
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